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Family Law Attorneys

June 2015 Archives

The dangerous connection between divorce and social media

Before the advent of smartphones, social media and constant connectedness, a divorcing couple could get a respite from one another. After all, sending a letter or good old fashioned stalking takes a fair amount of effort. These days, checking up on an ex's activities and whereabouts takes about three clicks of the mouse. We may live in the information age, but too much information can be a bad thing, especially when children are involved; it may not be in the best interests of the child to have two parents duking it out on the Internet for the world to see.

The bright side of divorce

At first, that headline might seem like a bit of a head scratcher. After all, it's no secret that divorce can be a miserable, gut-wrenching affair full of arguments and hurt feelings. That's because two disparate sides have to come to an agreement over child custody, alimony, child support and property division, a prospect that's easier said than done. But, every dark cloud has a silver lining as they say, even divorce.

Things you should know about alimony

Child support is often a hotly contested issue between divorcing couples, with parties frequently disagreeing on whether the court-ordered amount of support is too much or too little. If you do not have children, you may think that this is an area of divorce that you will not have to worry about, but you would not be entirely correct. Depending on the circumstances, a court may decide that spousal support (commonly called alimony) is appropriate for one of the divorcing parties.

Assets all divorcing women should know about

When you break it down to its most basic components, getting a divorce is essentially about dividing marital assets. Couples have to come to an agreement regarding the houses, the cars, the bank accounts and even the furniture. However, when it comes to high asset divorce, the splitting of a couple's marital property equitably can be a real challenge.

How does alimony affect taxes?

In the event of a divorce, one spouse may agree to paying spousal support, either a voluntarily settlement or through a court order. Of course, wherever money changes hands, Uncle Sam will want his cut, and this holds true for alimony as well. The former spouse who pays alimony can deduct alimony payments on that year's tax return. This is because the partner who receives the alimony is required to pay taxes on this money, though typically at a lower rate.

Things you should know about alimony

Child support is often a hotly contested issue between divorcing couples, with parties frequently disagreeing on whether the court-ordered amount of support is too much or too little. If you do not have children, you may think that this is an area of divorce that you will not have to worry about, but you would not be entirely correct. Depending on the circumstances, a court may decide that spousal support (commonly called alimony) is appropriate for one of the divorcing parties.

How does the FDCPA help you stop debt collection harassment?

Whether it's a mortgage, medical debt, credit card debt or student loans, dealing with financial burdens can be incredibly difficult. It might be keeping you up at night or dominating your thoughts throughout the day as you worry about how to make payments. On top of it all, you have debt collection agencies constantly calling, adding pressure to an already tenuous situation.