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Other complications that can arise during a custody battle

Fighting over custody often takes precedence over just about any other priority for parents. Unfortunately, these battles can be contentious and lengthy, which can create secondary issues that parents also need to resolve in addition to custody.

A few issues that parents may struggle with during a custody dispute include job-related problems, travel restrictions and public discussion on your situation.

What are the grounds for custody modification in Texas?

A lot can change in the years following a divorce and creation of a custody schedule. Children grow up; parents get remarried or find new jobs; financial circumstances often fluctuate.

Considering all that can change in the lives of parents and children, it can be important for parents with custody and visitation agreement to understand when and if that agreement might change.

What legal rights do step-parents have?

Family structures come in all shapes and sizes. As divorce rates have continued to remain steady for years, blended families and step-parent relationships have continued to be on the rise. With step-parenting becoming more common during many children's formative year's, many people are recognizing the important bond that still forms between parents and their non-biological children. Until 2000 the courts had often failed to acknowledge the importance of the step-parent/step-child relationship often failing to include the step-parent in any post-divorce custody situations. Now the courts have begun to acknowledge the bond and relationship development between step-parents and the children they help to raise and step-parents are now a larger part of the consideration during visitation and custody proceedings.

What legal rights do step-parents have?

Family structures come in all shapes and sizes. As divorce rates have continued to remain steady for years, blended families and step-parent relationships have continued to be on the rise. With step-parenting becoming more common during many children's formative year's, many people are recognizing the important bond that still forms between parents and their non-biological children. Until 2000 the courts had often failed to acknowledge the importance of the step-parent/step-child relationship often failing to include the step-parent in any post-divorce custody situations. Now the courts have begun to acknowledge the bond and relationship development between step-parents and the children they help to raise and step-parents are now a larger part of the consideration during visitation and custody proceedings.

What rights will a step-parent have in a child custody case?

What parents should know about non-disparagement clauses

Parenting a child with someone whom you do not like or trust is no easy task. If you are in this situation, you can feel scared, anxious and angry about how the other parent treats a child and what he or she might say to the child about you.

If you anticipate these types of challenges as you work out custody issues, then you might consider including a non-disparagement clause in your custody agreement. Below, we explain what this clause is and how it might improve your relationship with your child and the other parent of your child.

Using technology wisely when you share custody

Technology can be a double-edged sword with regard to family legal battles. For instance, it can spark contentious battles during a divorce when spouses use GPS or malware to spy on each other, but it also can preserve relationships between parents and children by allowing them to stay connected when they cannot be together physically.

If you have are a joint or sole managing conservator, then you should know some of the important ways technology can help -- and hurt -- your arrangement.

What you can do about high-conflict custody exchanges

Exchanging custody can be difficult when parents resent, distrust or hate each other. Even brief encounters can spiral into screaming matches, and there are parents who simply won't show up to an exchange in an effort to punish the other parent. There may also be legitimate concerns about a child's safety.

If you are dealing with these difficult elements of custody exchanges, you can take steps to take some of the heat out of the situation.

Addressing a child's preference in a custody case

One of the factors that Texas courts can consider when determining child custody is the preference of the child. This doesn't always happen, particularly if the child is under 12, but parents should understand and respect the fact that a child can have a say in his or her own future.

That being said, there are numerous ways parents can help their child through this difficult process. There are also things parents can do to make an already bad situation even worse for both themselves and their child. 

Grandparents and child custody in Texas

Did you know that more than 10,000 Texan children are living with grandparents and other relatives as a result of parental drug or alcohol addiction? This means that thousands of families are dealing not just with complicated health and familial issues, but legal issues as well.

If you are a grandparent who takes care of your grandchildren, or if you feel it would be in their best interests if you were to take care of them, then you should understand some basic elements regarding grandparents’ rights, visitation and custody.

Establishing paternity if you are an unmarried father

It is not uncommon for people to have children outside of marriage today. Millennials are increasingly putting off marriage until they are older, and some plan to never marry. However, many young people in committed relationships still have children together.

In these situations, regardless of how confident you are in the relationships with your partner and your baby, you would be wise to legally establish paternity.